Domestic Partnership Won’t Be Treated as Marriage

October 22, 2015

The Treasury has issued proposed regulations reflecting the Supreme Court’s decisions concerning same-sex marriage (Windsor, which struck down relevant parts of the Defense of Marriage Act, and Obergefell, which requires all states to permit and recognize same-sex marriages. In essence, the regulations treat same-sex marriage the same as the marriage of a man and a woman for federal tax purposes. However, registered domestic partnerships, civil unions, and other similar relationships will not be treated as marriages for federal tax purposes. Reproduced below is the explanation of this point offered in the preamble of the proposed regulations.

Registered Domestic Partnerships, Civil Unions, or Other Similar Relationships Not Denominated as Marriage

For federal tax purposes, the term “marriage” does not include registered domestic partnerships, civil unions, or other similar relationships recognized under state law that are not denominated as a marriage under that state’s law, and the terms 5 “spouse,” “husband and wife,” “husband,” and “wife” do not include individuals who have entered into such a relationship.

Except when prohibited by statute, the IRS has traditionally looked to the states to define marital status. See Loughran v. Loughran, 292 U.S. 216, 223 (1934) (“Marriages not polygamous or incestuous, or otherwise declared void by statute, will, if valid by the law of the state where entered into, be recognized as valid in every other jurisdiction.”); see also Revenue Ruling 58-66 (1958-1 CB 60) (if a state recognizes a common-law marriage as a valid marriage, the IRS will also recognize the couple as married for purposes of federal income tax filing status and personal exemptions). States have carefully considered the types of relationships that they choose to recognize as a marriage and the types that they choose to recognize as something other than a marriage. Although some states extend all of the rights and responsibilities of marriage under state law to couples in registered domestic partnerships, civil unions, or other similar relationships, those states have intentionally chosen not to denominate those relationships as marriages. Similar rules exist in some foreign jurisdictions.

Some couples have chosen to enter into a civil union or registered domestic partnership even when they could have married, and some couples who are in a civil union or registered domestic partnership have chosen not to convert those relationships into a marriage even when they have had the opportunity to do so. In many cases, this choice was deliberate, and couples who enter into civil unions or registered domestic partnerships may have done so with the expectation that their relationship will not be treated as a marriage for purposes of federal law. For some of these couples, there are benefits to being in a relationship that provides some, but not all, of the protections and 6 responsibilities of marriage. For example, some individuals who were previously married and receive Social Security benefits as a result of their previous marriage may choose to enter into a civil union or registered domestic partnership (instead of a marriage) so that they do not lose their Social Security benefits. More generally, the rates at which some couples’ income is taxed may increase if they are considered married and thus required to file a married-filing-separately or married-filing-jointly federal income tax return. Treating couples in civil unions and registered domestic partnerships the same as married couples who are in a relationship denominated as marriage under state law could undermine the expectations certain couples have regarding the scope of their relationship. Further, no provision of the Code indicates that Congress intended to recognize as marriages civil unions, registered domestic partnerships, or similar relationships. Accordingly, the IRS will not treat civil unions, registered domestic partnerships, or other similar relationships as marriages for federal tax purposes.

Please follow and like us:

Sign up for our FREE NEWSLETTER